Stages of change for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption among adults and young adults participating in the national 5-a-day for better health community studies

Marci Kramish Campbell*, Kim D. Reynolds, Stephen Havas, Susan Curry, Donald Bishop, Theresa Nicklas, Ruth Palombo, David Buller, Robert Feldman, Marie Topor, Carolyn Johnson, Shirley A A Beresford, Brenda McAdams Motsinger, Calvin Morrill, Jerianne Heimendinger

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

89 Scopus citations

Abstract

Higher fruit and vegetable consumption is associated with a reduced risk of certain cancers and chronic diseases. The 5-a-Day for Better Health community studies are evaluating population-based strategies to achieving dietary behavior change using the stages-of-change model and associated theories. The authors present baseline comparisons of stages of change for fruit and vegetable consumption among adults and young adults in eight study sites representing diverse regions of the United States and diverse populations and settings. Three dominant stages, precontemplation, preparation, and maintenance, were found across sites. Women and those with college degrees were more likely to be in action/maintenance. Fruit and vegetable consumption, self-efficacy, and knowledge of the 5-a-Day recommendation were positively associated with more advanced stages of change in all study sites. The authors discuss the findings in relation to possible limitations of this and other dietary stages-of-change measures and suggest directions for future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)513-534
Number of pages22
JournalHealth Education and Behavior
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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