Stepwise impairment of neural stem cell proliferation and neurogenesis concomitant with disruption of blood-brain barrier in recurrent ischemic stroke

Ruihe Lin, Michael Lang, Nicolette Heinsinger, Geoffrey Stricsek, Justine Zhang, Renato Iozzo, Robert Rosenwasser, Lorraine Iacovitti*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Stroke patients are at increased risk for recurrent stroke and development of post-stroke dementia. In this study, we investigated the effects of recurrent stroke on adult brain neurogenesis using a novel rat model of recurrent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) developed in our laboratory. Using BrdU incorporation, activation and depletion of stem cells in the subgranular zone (SGZ) and subventricular zone (SVZ) were assessed in control rats and rats after one or two strokes. In vitro neurosphere assay was used to assess the effects of plasma from normal and stroke rats. Also, EM and permeability studies were used to evaluate changes in the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) of the SGZ after recurrent stroke. We found that proliferation and neurogenesis was activated 14 days after MCAO. This was correlated with increased permeability in the BBB to factors which increase proliferation in a neurosphere assay. However, with each stroke, there was a stepwise decrease of proliferating stem cells and impaired neurogenesis on the ipsilateral side. On the contralateral side, this process stabilized after a first stroke. These studies indicate that stem cells are activated after MCAO, possibly after increased access to systemic stroke-related factors through a leaky BBB. However, the recruitment of stem cells for neurogenesis after stroke results in a stepwise ipsilateral decline with each ischemic event, which could contribute to post-stroke dementia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)49-58
Number of pages10
JournalNeurobiology of Disease
Volume115
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Blood-brain-barrier
  • Dementia
  • Hippocampus
  • Neural stem cell
  • Neurogenesis
  • Recurrent stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology

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