Stereotype Reactance at the Bargaining Table: The Effect of Stereotype Activation and Power on Claiming and Creating Value

Laura J. Kray*, Jochen Reb, Adam D. Galinsky, Leigh Thompson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

88 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two experiments explored the hypothesis that the impact of activating gender stereotypes on negotiated agreements in mixed-gender negotiations depends on the manner in which the stereotype is activated (explicitly vs. implicitly) and the content of the stereotype (linking negotiation performance to stereotypically male vs. stereotypically female traits). Specifically, two experiments investigated the generality and limits of stereotype reactance. The results of Experiment 1 suggest that negotiated outcomes become more one-sided in favor of the high power negotiator when masculine traits are explicitly linked to negotiator effectiveness. In contrast, the results of Experiment 2 suggest that negotiated outcomes are more integrative (win-win) when feminine traits are explicitly linked to negotiator effectiveness. In total, performance in mixed-gender negotiations is strongly affected by the cognitions and motivations that negotiators bring to the bargaining table.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)399-411
Number of pages13
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2004

Keywords

  • Gender
  • Negotiations
  • Power
  • Reactance
  • Stereotype
  • Threat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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