Stress analysis of a canine spinal motion segment using finite element technique

Tae Hong Lim*, Vijay K. Goel, James Neil Weinstein, Weizeng Kong

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

In order to use the in vivo canine model for investigating time-dependent changes in the hard and soft tissues following surgery, it is essential to document any departures in the stress and strain distributions within canine and human spinal segments, since the living tissue is known to respond to changes in these parameters. Similarities between the stress distributions within the canine and human spinal segments will further strengthen the use of canine models of biomechanical studies. Furthermore, comparison of the effects of spinal fixation on a canine vs. human motion segments is necessary to justify the use of canine models for the study of spinal instrumentation. For this purpose, finite element (FE) models of the intact and stabilized canine spinal segments were developed for stress analysis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication1992 Advances in Bioengineering
PublisherPubl by ASME
Pages345-347
Number of pages3
Volume22
ISBN (Print)0791811166
StatePublished - Dec 1 1992
EventWinter Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers - Anaheim, CA, USA
Duration: Nov 8 1992Nov 13 1992

Other

OtherWinter Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers
CityAnaheim, CA, USA
Period11/8/9211/13/92

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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