“STRESS” POLYCYTHAEMIA AND PERIPHERAL FACIAL PALSY COMPLICATIONS OF SEVERE HYPERTENSION

P. M. ZEIS*, S. RAO, E. G. JOHN, L. C. ASCHINBERG

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Abstract. An 11‐month‐old boy had an episode of generalized convulsions followed by a right peripheral facial palsy, which resolved gradually within 3 weeks. Three months later he had another similar episode of convulsions followed by a left peripheral facial palsy. On both occasions it was found that he had polycythaemia. A careful physical examination discovered that the child had severe hypertension. Extensive laboratory investigations did not reveal a cause for his hypertension. Haematologic investigations showed that the polycythaemia was due to a contracted plasma volume as a result of the hypertension. The peripheral facial palsy most probably was due to a blood clot in the facial canal, below the origin of the nerve to m. stapedius, as audiograms were normal and lacrimation preserved. Control of the hypertension resulted in resolution of the facial palsy within 4 weeks and normal haematocrit readings within 6 weeks. It should be stressed that every patient with peripheral facial palsy should be examined for hypertension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)287-289
Number of pages3
JournalActa Pædiatrica
Volume68
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1979

Keywords

  • Hypertension
  • facial palsy
  • polycythaemia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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