Structural defects in transition metal dichalcogenide core-shell architectures

Jennifer G. DiStefano, Akshay A. Murthy, Hee Joon Jung, Roberto dos Reis, Vinayak P. Dravid*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Curvature presents a powerful approach to design atomic structure and tailor material properties in atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). The emerging TMD core-shell architecture, in which a multilayer TMD shell encapsulates a curved nanoparticle core, presents the opportunity to controllably induce defects into a TMD crystal by strategically constructing the shape of the underlying core. However, harnessing this potential platform first requires robust characterization of the unique structural features present in the core-shell architecture. To this end, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM (STEM) are particularly powerful tools for direct structural characterization of 2D materials with a high spatial resolution and precision. Here, we reveal and describe defects inherently present in the TMD core-shell architecture. We develop a comprehensive framework to classify the observed defects and discuss potential origins and implications of structural variations. We utilize high resolution S/TEM to reveal the relationship between defects and their associated strain fields. Furthermore, we demonstrate that TMD shells often possess a wide range of interlayer spacings with varied spatial distribution. By exploring the rich array of structural defects inherently present in the TMD core-shell architecture, we provide an important foundation to ultimately induce exotic properties in TMDs through sophisticated defect engineering.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number223103
JournalApplied Physics Letters
Volume118
Issue number22
DOIs
StatePublished - May 31 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Structural defects in transition metal dichalcogenide core-shell architectures'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this