Subgroups of young sexual minority women based on drinking locations and companions and links with alcohol consequences, drinking motives, and LGBTQ-related constructs

Anne M. Fairlie*, Brian A. Feinstein, Christine M. Lee, Debra Kaysen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Sexual minority women (SMW; e.g., lesbians, bisexual women) are at increased risk for alcohol use disorders and related problems compared with heterosexual women. However, little is known about the social context in which drinking occurs in this high-risk population. This study used latent class analysis to identify subgroups of SMW based on drinking locations and companions and examined whether class membership was associated with consequences, drinking motives, and LGBTQ-related constructs (e.g., outness, discrimination). Method: A sample of 670 SMW reported on alcohol use, drinking locations and companions, and related measures as part of a larger study on women’s health. Results: Based on SMW’s patterns of responding to drinking locations and companions, latent class analysis identified five classes: Infrequent Drinking Contexts (10% of sample, reference class), Private/Intimate Drinking (28%), Convivial Drinking (29%), Alone/Con-Alone/Con- vivial Drinking (20%), and Multiple Drinking Contexts (13%). Greater consequences were associated with greater odds of membership in the Convivial, Alone/Convivial, and Multiple Drinking Contexts classes relative to the Infrequent Drinking Contexts Class. Drinking motives were associated with class membership, although significant group comparisons varied by motive. Higher LGBTQ community involvement was associated with greater odds of membership in the Convivial, Alone/Convivial, and Multiple Drinking Contexts classes. Conclusions: Drinking classes paralleled those found in the literature on heterosexual individuals (e.g., public versus private contexts). Women in the Alone/ Convivial and Multiple Drinking Contexts classes may be at particular risk. The context within which SMW drink may be a useful way to identify women at highest risk for problematic drinking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)741-750
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of studies on alcohol and drugs
Volume79
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Toxicology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Subgroups of young sexual minority women based on drinking locations and companions and links with alcohol consequences, drinking motives, and LGBTQ-related constructs'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this