Successful physical therapy for constipation related to puborectalis dyssynergia improves symptom severity and quality of life

Christina Lewicky-Gaupp*, Daniel M. Morgan, William D. Chey, Philip Muellerleile, Dee E. Fenner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

PURPOSE: This study evaluated symptom severity and quality of life in patients with puborectalis dyssynergia before and after physical therapy. METHODS: Twenty-two patients with puborectalis dyssynergia were prospectively enrolled into a multidisciplinary program for the treatment of pelvic floor and bowel disorders in this case series. All patients had functional constipation and evidence of puborectalis dyssynergia. Physical therapy and behavioral counseling were offered to all. Patients completed the Patient Health Questionnaire, the Patient-Assessment of Constipation Symptom Questionnaire, and the Patient-Assessment of Constipation Quality of Life Questionnaire. RESULTS: Sixteen patients successfully completed the program. Symptom severity decreased after physical therapy (2.1 ± 0.7 vs. 1.3 ± 0.9, P = 0.007). Quality of life also improved significantly (2.6 ± 0.8 vs. 1.5 ± 1.0, P = 0.007). Patients reported less physical discomfort, fewer worries/concerns, and indicated satisfaction with treatment. The difference in symptom severity was highly correlated with improvement in quality of life (r = 0.7, P = .005). CONCLUSIONS: Successful physical therapy for patients with puborectalis dyssynergia is associated with improvements in constipation-related symptoms and in quality of life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1686-1691
Number of pages6
JournalDiseases of the Colon and Rectum
Volume51
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2008

Keywords

  • Constipation
  • Physical therapy
  • Quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Successful physical therapy for constipation related to puborectalis dyssynergia improves symptom severity and quality of life'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this