Successful treatment of metastatic βhCG-secreting germ cell tumor occurring 3 years after total resection of a pineal mature teratoma

Stefania Cardellicchio, Silvia Farina, Anna Maria Buccoliero, Benedetta Agresti, Lorenzo Genitori, Maurizio De Martino, Jason Fangusaro, Iacopo Sardi*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Patients diagnosed with intracranial teratoma are at risk for developing a recurrent malignant germ cell tumor. We describe a 14-year-old boy initially diagnosed with a mature teratoma in the pineal region that recurred as a metastatic beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (βHCG)-secreting germ cell tumor 3 years after gross total resection. A surveillance brain MRI scan during follow-up demonstrated multiple lesions within the ventricular and subependymal area infiltrating the brain parenchyma along with concomitant elevated levels of βHCG in both the serum and cerebrospinal fluid. The patient underwent chemotherapy with PEI (cis-platinum, etoposide, ifosfamide) followed by radiation therapy according to the SIOP CNS GCT protocol. The patient is currently alive without evidence of disease 35 months after starting therapy. Conclusions: A careful and long-term follow-up including scheduled tumor markers as well as surveillance MRI scans is required for patients with intracranial teratoma in an effort to detect and diagnose recurrent malignant disease, especially since multimodal therapy provides the potential for long-term cure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1011-1015
Number of pages5
JournalEuropean Journal of Pediatrics
Volume173
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2014

Keywords

  • CNS germ cell tumor
  • Chemotherapy
  • Pineal tumor
  • Radiotherapy
  • Teratoma
  • βHCG

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Successful treatment of metastatic βhCG-secreting germ cell tumor occurring 3 years after total resection of a pineal mature teratoma'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this