Suddenly arrested intersonic shear crack

Y. Huang*, H. Gao

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

We study a mode II crack suddenly stopping after propagating intersonically for a short time. The solution is obtained by superposing the fundamental solution and the auxiliary problem of a static crack emitting dynamic dislocations such that the relative crack face displacement in the fundamental solution is negated ahead of where the crack tip has stopped. We find that, after the crack stops moving, the stress intensity factor rapidly rises to a finite value and then starts to change gradually toward the equilibrium value for a static crack. A most interesting feature is that the static value of stress intensity is reached neither instantaneously like a suddenly stopping subsonic crack nor asymptotically like a suddenly stopping edge dislocation. Rather, the dynamic stress intensity factor changes continuously as the shear and Rayleigh waves catch up with the stopped crack tip from behind, approaches negative infinity when the Rayleigh wave arrives, and then suddenly assumes the equilibrium static value when all the waves have passed by. This study is an important step toward the study of intersonic crack propagation with arbitrary, non-uniform velocities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)21-28
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers, Applied Mechanics Division, AMD
Volume247
StatePublished - Dec 1 2001
Event2001 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition - New York, NY, United States
Duration: Nov 11 2001Nov 16 2001

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Cracks
Rayleigh waves
Stress intensity factors
Crack tips
Edge dislocations
Shear waves
Crack propagation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

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title = "Suddenly arrested intersonic shear crack",
abstract = "We study a mode II crack suddenly stopping after propagating intersonically for a short time. The solution is obtained by superposing the fundamental solution and the auxiliary problem of a static crack emitting dynamic dislocations such that the relative crack face displacement in the fundamental solution is negated ahead of where the crack tip has stopped. We find that, after the crack stops moving, the stress intensity factor rapidly rises to a finite value and then starts to change gradually toward the equilibrium value for a static crack. A most interesting feature is that the static value of stress intensity is reached neither instantaneously like a suddenly stopping subsonic crack nor asymptotically like a suddenly stopping edge dislocation. Rather, the dynamic stress intensity factor changes continuously as the shear and Rayleigh waves catch up with the stopped crack tip from behind, approaches negative infinity when the Rayleigh wave arrives, and then suddenly assumes the equilibrium static value when all the waves have passed by. This study is an important step toward the study of intersonic crack propagation with arbitrary, non-uniform velocities.",
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Suddenly arrested intersonic shear crack. / Huang, Y.; Gao, H.

In: American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Applied Mechanics Division, AMD, Vol. 247, 01.12.2001, p. 21-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Suddenly arrested intersonic shear crack

AU - Huang, Y.

AU - Gao, H.

PY - 2001/12/1

Y1 - 2001/12/1

N2 - We study a mode II crack suddenly stopping after propagating intersonically for a short time. The solution is obtained by superposing the fundamental solution and the auxiliary problem of a static crack emitting dynamic dislocations such that the relative crack face displacement in the fundamental solution is negated ahead of where the crack tip has stopped. We find that, after the crack stops moving, the stress intensity factor rapidly rises to a finite value and then starts to change gradually toward the equilibrium value for a static crack. A most interesting feature is that the static value of stress intensity is reached neither instantaneously like a suddenly stopping subsonic crack nor asymptotically like a suddenly stopping edge dislocation. Rather, the dynamic stress intensity factor changes continuously as the shear and Rayleigh waves catch up with the stopped crack tip from behind, approaches negative infinity when the Rayleigh wave arrives, and then suddenly assumes the equilibrium static value when all the waves have passed by. This study is an important step toward the study of intersonic crack propagation with arbitrary, non-uniform velocities.

AB - We study a mode II crack suddenly stopping after propagating intersonically for a short time. The solution is obtained by superposing the fundamental solution and the auxiliary problem of a static crack emitting dynamic dislocations such that the relative crack face displacement in the fundamental solution is negated ahead of where the crack tip has stopped. We find that, after the crack stops moving, the stress intensity factor rapidly rises to a finite value and then starts to change gradually toward the equilibrium value for a static crack. A most interesting feature is that the static value of stress intensity is reached neither instantaneously like a suddenly stopping subsonic crack nor asymptotically like a suddenly stopping edge dislocation. Rather, the dynamic stress intensity factor changes continuously as the shear and Rayleigh waves catch up with the stopped crack tip from behind, approaches negative infinity when the Rayleigh wave arrives, and then suddenly assumes the equilibrium static value when all the waves have passed by. This study is an important step toward the study of intersonic crack propagation with arbitrary, non-uniform velocities.

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