Sun protection preferences and behaviors among young adult males during maximum ultraviolet radiation exposure activities.

Marilyn Wickenheiser*, Mary Kate Baker, Rikki Gaber, Hanz Blatt, June K. Robinson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study explores sun protection attitudes, preferences, and behaviors among young adult males participating in an open-field activity with extreme ultraviolet radiation exposure. Male drum corps members (n = 137) responded to survey questions regarding their behavior and willingness to engage in sun protection and barriers to sunscreen usage. A subset of members (n = 31) participated in cognitive interviews exploring various sunscreen products and intervention techniques. Participants were knowledgeable about health risks and protection benefits regarding sun exposure. Generally, males had positive attitudes and normative beliefs about using sunscreen. A barrier to sunscreen re-application was lack of adequate time to reapply sunscreen during the open field activity. Males preferred a towelette application method, but were unfamiliar with its efficacy and proper use. Thus, they were more likely to use the more familiar sunscreen spray. To increase sun protection behaviors and lower skin cancer risk for males participating in open-field activities, breaks must be allotted every 2 h and have sufficient time to allow sunscreen application. Future development and research into delivery systems that rapidly and evenly apply sunscreen may help lower exposure in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3203-3216
Number of pages14
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume10
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Sun protection preferences and behaviors among young adult males during maximum ultraviolet radiation exposure activities.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this