Superior memory and higher cortical volumes in unusually successful cognitive aging

Theresa M. Harrison, Sandra Weintraub, M. Marsel Mesulam, Emily Rogalski*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Scopus citations

Abstract

Abstract It is "normal" for old age to be associated with gradual decline in memory and brain mass. However, there are anecdotal reports of individuals who seem immune to age-related memory impairment, but these individuals have not been studied systematically. This study sought to establish that such cognitive SuperAgers exist and to determine if they were also resistant to age-related loss of cortical brain volume. SuperAgers were defined as individuals over age 80 with episodic memory performance at least as good as normative values for 50- to 65-year-olds. Cortical morphometry of the SuperAgers was compared to two cognitively normal cohorts: age-matched elderly and 50- to 65-year-olds. The SuperAgers' cerebral cortex was significantly thicker than their healthy age-matched peers and displayed no atrophy compared to the 50- to 65-year-old healthy group. Unexpectedly, a region of left anterior cingulate cortex was significantly thicker in the SuperAgers than in both elderly and middle-aged controls. Our findings identify cognitive and neuroanatomical features of a cohort that appears to resist average age-related changes of memory capacity and cortical volume. A better understanding of the underlying factors promoting this potential trajectory of unusually successful aging may provide insight for preventing age-related cognitive impairments or the more severe changes associated with Alzheimer's disease. (JINS, 2012, 18, 1-5)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1081-1085
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society
Volume18
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2012

Keywords

  • Dementia
  • Elderly
  • Freesurfer
  • Neuroimaging
  • Neuropsychology
  • Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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