Surface-enhanced raman spectroscopy: Using nanoparticles to detect trace amounts of colorants in works of art

Federica Pozzi*, Stephanie Zaleski, Francesca Casadio, Marco Leona, John R. Lombardi, Richard P. Van Duyne

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

In recent years, powerful physical processes occurring in the vicinity of nanoscale metal surfaces have been exploited in the art world for the detection of trace amounts of colorants with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). With this technique, naturally occurring and man-made organic molecules used as dyes and pigments in objects from antiquity to the present day are being detected with high molecular specificity and unprecedented sensitivity. This chapter reviews the broad spectrum of SERS analytical methodologies and instrumental improvements that have been developed over the years in the field of cultural heritage science, and discusses significant case studies within different types of works of art and archaeological artifacts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationNanoscience and Cultural Heritage
PublisherAtlantis Press
Pages161-204
Number of pages44
ISBN (Electronic)9789462391987
ISBN (Print)9789462391970
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Engineering(all)
  • Chemistry(all)

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