Surgery for gliomas

Matthew Christopher Tate*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Surgical resection, with the goal of maximal tumor removal, is now standard of care for the overwhelming majority of newly diagnosed gliomas. In order to achieve this goal while minimizing the risk of postoperative neurologic deficits, intraoperative brain mapping remains the gold standard. Recent advances in technical aspects of preoperative and intraoperative brain mapping, as well as our understanding of the functional anatomy of the human brain with respect to language, movement, sensation, and cognition, particularly at the subcortical level, have improved our ability to safely perform aggressive resective surgeries in eloquent areas. In this chapter, the functional anatomy of the human brain relevant to intrinsic tumor resection is reviewed. In addition, general principles governing surgical management of patients are highlighted, with a particular emphasis on awake brain mapping.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-47
Number of pages17
JournalCancer treatment and research
Volume163
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Brain Mapping
Glioma
Anatomy
Kinesthesis
Aptitude
Brain
Standard of Care
Neurologic Manifestations
Cognition
Neoplasms
Language

Keywords

  • Glioma surgery
  • Mapping

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

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abstract = "Surgical resection, with the goal of maximal tumor removal, is now standard of care for the overwhelming majority of newly diagnosed gliomas. In order to achieve this goal while minimizing the risk of postoperative neurologic deficits, intraoperative brain mapping remains the gold standard. Recent advances in technical aspects of preoperative and intraoperative brain mapping, as well as our understanding of the functional anatomy of the human brain with respect to language, movement, sensation, and cognition, particularly at the subcortical level, have improved our ability to safely perform aggressive resective surgeries in eloquent areas. In this chapter, the functional anatomy of the human brain relevant to intrinsic tumor resection is reviewed. In addition, general principles governing surgical management of patients are highlighted, with a particular emphasis on awake brain mapping.",
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Surgery for gliomas. / Tate, Matthew Christopher.

In: Cancer treatment and research, Vol. 163, 01.01.2015, p. 31-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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