Survival disparities by hospital volume among American Women with gynecologic cancers

Brandon Luke L. Seagle*, Anna E. Strohl, Monica Dandapani, Wilberto Nieves-Neira, Shohreh Shahabi

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose We describe survival disparities among women with uterine, ovarian, or cervical cancer by cancer-specific mean annual hospital volume. Methods National Cancer Database 1998-2011 uterine (n = 441,863), ovarian (n = 223,017), and cervical (n = 146,698) cancer data sets were used. Cancer-specific mean annual hospital volumes were calculated. Overall survival (OS) was plotted by hospital volume using restricted mean OS times from Cox regression. Results Uterine, ovarian, and cervical cancers were reported from 1,651, 1,633, and 1,600 hospitals, respectively. Median values of mean annual hospital volumes among hospitals were 8.6 (interquartile range [IQR], 2.6 to 20.8), 4.4 (IQR, 1.4 to 10.3), and 2.4 (IQR, 0.6 to 6.6) for uterine, ovarian, and cervical cancers, respectively. Increased hospital volume was associated with increased OS among women with stage III to IV high-grade serous ovarian cancer, stage II to IV squamous or adenocarcinoma cervical cancer, and stage I to IV endometrioid, clear cell, serous, or carcinosarcoma uterine cancers (all P < .03). Differential OS between women treated at higher- versus lower-volume cancer centers exceeded 5, 5, and 13 months among women with advanced endometrial, ovarian, or cervical cancer, respectively (all P < .001). Hospital volume was not associated with OS among patients with stage II to IV cervical cancer treated with brachytherapy (P=.17). Use of adjuvant therapies decreasedOSdisparities by hospital volume among women with advanced ovarian or endometrial cancer. Conclusion Increased delivery of brachytherapy for treatment of cervical cancer may decrease survival disparities by hospital volume. Standardization of adjuvant therapies may diminish survival disparities by hospital volume among women with advanced ovarian or endometrial cancer. In addition, survival of American women with gynecologic cancer may be increased by centralization of care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalJCO Clinical Cancer Informatics
Volume2017
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology
  • Health Informatics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Survival disparities by hospital volume among American Women with gynecologic cancers'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this