Sustaining the momentum for global cancer research and career development in the COVID-19 era: Lessons and challenges

Jonah Musa*, Francis A. Magaji, Maryam J. Ali, Mark Okolo, Olugbenga A. Silas, Godwin E. Imade, Stefan J. Green, Supriya D. Mehta, Lifang Hou, Robert L. Murphy

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Cervical cancer is the fourth commonest cancer affecting almost 600 000 women annually worldwide with over 300 000 deaths [1]. Over 70% of these cases are in sub-Saharan Africa with correspondingly high mortality due to late presentation of cases and poor infrastructure for treatment of invasive cancer. Yet, this is one cancer that the natural history is well-known with precancerous conditions that are detectable and treatable when identified through screening. Cervical precancer and invasive cervical cancer is entirely attributable to a sexually transmissible viral infection, the high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) [2]. A previous report of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) on the burden of human papillomavirus disease in Nigeria, estimates that over 53 million women in Nigeria are at risk of invasive cervical cancer (ICC); and 14 089 new cases of ICC occur annually which lead to 8240 deaths [3].

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number03010
JournalJournal of Global Health
Volume13
DOIs
StatePublished - 2023

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Sustaining the momentum for global cancer research and career development in the COVID-19 era: Lessons and challenges'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this