Synaptic Abnormalities and Neuroplasticity: Molecular Mechanisms of Cognitive Dysfunction in Genetic Mouse Models of Schizophrenia

Ruoqi Gao, Theron A. Russell, Peter Penzes

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Cognitive dysfunction is a core symptom of schizophrenia and the most accurate predictor of clinical outcome. Unfortunately, current treatments cannot improve cognitive deficits, resulting in a need for deeper understanding of the disease's pathogenesis. Dendritic spines are intimately linked to cognition, with strong evidence that spine plasticity is impaired in the schizophrenic brain. Mouse models can provide unprecedented insight into how genetic factors influence cognition via regulation of spine plasticity. Here, we review the cognitive and spine data of several prominent genetic mouse models of schizophrenia risk genes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHandbook of Behavioral Neuroscience
PublisherElsevier B.V.
Pages375-390
Number of pages16
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Publication series

NameHandbook of Behavioral Neuroscience
Volume23
ISSN (Print)1569-7339

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Dendritic spine
  • Mouse model
  • Schizophrenia
  • Synapse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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