Syngeneic N1-S1 Orthotopic Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Sprague Dawley Rat for the Development of Interventional Oncology-Based Immunotherapy: Survival Assay and Tumor Immune Microenvironment

Bongseo Choi, Jason Pe, Bo Yu*, Dong Hyun Kim*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Rodent HCC rat models provide advantages for interventional oncology (IO) based immunotherapy research compared to other established larger animal models or mice models. Rapid and predictable tumor growth and affordable costs permit the formation of a compelling preclinical model investigating novel IO catheter-directed therapies and local ablation therapies. Among orthotopic HCC models, the N1-S1 orthotopic HCC model has been involved in many research cases. Suboptimal tumor induction rates and potential spontaneous regression during tumor implantation procedures discouraged the use of the N1-S1 HCC model in IO-based immunotherapies. Here, N1-S1 HCC models were generated with a subcapsular implantation of two different number of N1-S1 cells using a mini-laporatomy. Tumor growth assay and immunological profiles which can preclinically evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of IO-based immunotherapy, were characterized. Finally, an N1-S1 HCC rat model generated with the proposed procedure demonstrated a representative immune suppressive HCC tumor environment without self-tumor regression. The optimized syngeneic N1-S1 HCC rat models represent an essential tool for pre-clinical evaluation of new IO immunotherapies for the treatment of HCC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number913
JournalCancers
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2023

Keywords

  • cancer immunotherapy
  • hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)
  • interventional oncology
  • rodent HCC animal model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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