Targeted disruption of the mouse ing1 locus results in reduced body size, hypersensitivity to radiation and elevated incidence of lymphomas

J. V. Kichina, M. Zeremski, L. Aris, K. V. Gurova, E. Walker, R. Franks, A. Y. Nikitin, H. Kiyokawa, A. V. Gudkov*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

57 Scopus citations

Abstract

Ing1 belongs to the family of evolutionary conserved genes encoding nuclear PHD finger-containing proteins implicated in a variety of processes, including tumorigenesis, replicative senescence, excision repair and response to genotoxic stress. We have generated mice deficient in all the isoforms of Ing1 by targeted disruption of the exon that is common for all ing1 transcripts. Embryonic fibroblasts from ing1-knockout mice were similar to the wild-type cells in their growth characteristics, replicative lifespan in culture, p53 induction and sensitivity to various cytotoxic treatments with minor alterations in cell cycle distribution in response to genotoxic stress. ing1-deficient animals are characterized by reduced size with no obvious morphological, physiological or behavioral abnormalities, indicating that ing1 function is dispensable for the viability of mice under normal physiological conditions. Loss of ing1 was associated with earlier onset and higher incidence of lymphomas. Consistent with the possible involvement of Ing1 in DNA repair, ing1-deficient mice were more sensitive to total body gamma radiation. Our observations are well in line with the suggested role of ing1 as a candidate tumor suppressor gene involved in control of DNA damage response.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)857-866
Number of pages10
JournalOncogene
Volume25
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 9 2006

Keywords

  • Gene knockout
  • ING1
  • Lymphoma
  • Mouse
  • Radiation sensitivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Cancer Research

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