Teacher quality at the high school level

The importance of accounting for tracks

Clement Kirabo Jackson*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Unlike in elementary school, high school teacher effects may be confounded with both selection to tracks and track-level treatments. I document confounding track effects and show that traditional tests for the existence of teacher effects are biased. After accounting for biases, high school algebra and English teachers have smaller test score effects than found in previous studies and value-added estimates are weak predictors of teachers’ future performance. Results indicate that either (a) teachers are less influential in high school than in elementary school or (b) test score effects are a weak measure of teacher quality at the high school level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)645-684
Number of pages40
JournalJournal of Labor Economics
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2014

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High school
Teacher quality
Test scores
Confounding
Predictors
Value added

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Industrial relations
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

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Teacher quality at the high school level : The importance of accounting for tracks. / Jackson, Clement Kirabo.

In: Journal of Labor Economics, Vol. 32, No. 4, 01.10.2014, p. 645-684.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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