Temporal and spatial changes in GATA transcription factor expression are coincident with development of the chicken optic tectum

Jon M. Kornhauser, Mark W. Leonard, Masayuki Yamamoto, Jennifer H. LaVail, Kelly E. Mayo, James Douglas Engel*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

The molecular mechanisms specifying patterns of gene expression in the vertebrate brain, which in turn determine the developmental fates of specific neurons, are yet to be clearly defined. Individual members of a recently identified family of transcriptional regulatory proteins, the GATA factors, are required for the differentiation of certain hematopoietic cell lineages. We show here that two of the members of this gene family, GATA-2 and GATA-3, are expressed within discrete cell populations of the chicken optic tectum during embryogenesis, and that they have highly restricted patterns of expression in the developing chicken brain. Furthermore, the induction of GATA factor expression within specific cell layers parallels the well established spatial (rostral to caudal) and temporal pattern of optic tectum development. The observation that both the timing of appearance and the localization of expression of GATA-2 and GATA-3 are correlated with optic tectum development suggest that these transcription factors may be associated with the initiation of gene transcription required for the determination of specific neuronal fates within visual areas of the vertebrate brain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)100-110
Number of pages11
JournalMolecular Brain Research
Volume23
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1994

Keywords

  • GATA
  • Neural development
  • Optic tectum
  • Transcription factor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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