Testing the Connectivity Paradox: Linking Teleworkers' Communication Media Use to Social Presence, Stress from Interruptions, and Organizational Identification

Kathryn L. Fonner, Michael E. Roloff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

49 Scopus citations

Abstract

Scholars emphasize the importance of rich communication media for the development of Teleworkers' organizational identification, but tests of these relationships have produced inconsistent results. The connectivity paradox helps explain these findings. The paradox suggests that Teleworkers' connectivity to others through communication media facilitates remote work by affording greater social presence, while also negating the benefits of telework by enabling stressful interruptions. These outcomes of connectivity may benefit and detract from identification. We propose a model linking the core features of the connectivity paradox to organizational identification. Teleworkers and office workers were surveyed, and a multigroup path analysis was utilized. Results indicate that connectivity increases stress from interruptions and indirectly diminishes Teleworkers' identification.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)205-231
Number of pages27
JournalCommunication Monographs
Volume79
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2012

Keywords

  • Connectivity
  • Interruptions
  • Organizational Identification
  • Social Presence
  • Telework

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics

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