Texture analysis on preoperative contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging identifies microvascular invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma

Gregory C. Wilson*, Roberto Cannella, Guido Fiorentini, Chengli Shen, Amir Borhani, Alessandro Furlan, Allan Tsung

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Radiomic texture analysis quantifies tumor heterogeneity. The aim of this study is to determine if radiomics can predict biologic aggressiveness in HCC and identify tumors with MVI. Methods: Single-center, retrospective review of HCC patients undergoing resection/ablation with curative intent from 2009 to 2017. DICOM images from preoperative MRIs were analyzed with texture analysis software. Texture analysis parameters extracted on T1, T2, hepatic arterial phase (HAP) and portal venous phase (PVP) images. Multivariate logistic regression analysis evaluated factors associated with MVI. Results: MVI was present in 52.2% (n = 133) of HCCs. On multivariate analysis only T1 mean (OR = 0.97, 95%CI 0.95–0.99, p = 0.043) and PVP entropy (OR = 4.7, 95%CI 1.37–16.3, p = 0.014) were associated with tumor MVI. Area under ROC curve was 0.83 for this final model. Empirical optimal cutpoint for PVP tumor entropy and T1 tumor mean were 5.73 and 23.41, respectively. At these cutpoint values, sensitivity was 0.68 and 0.5, respectively and specificity was 0.64 and 0.86. When both criteria were met, the probability of MVI in the tumor was 87%. Conclusion: Tumor entropy and mean are both associated with MVI. Texture analysis on preoperative imaging correlates with microscopic features of HCC and can be used to predict patients with high-risk tumors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1622-1630
Number of pages9
JournalHPB
Volume22
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2020
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

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