“That was my occupation”: Oral narrative, performance, and black feminist thought

D. Soyini Madison*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Scopus citations

Abstract

Black feminist thought supports the interdependence of what are called “theories of the flesh” and “specialized knowledge.” Theories of the flesh reflect the distinctive interpretations of the world carved out of the material realities of a group's life experiences. Specialized knowledge infuses elements and themes of black women's culture and traditions with critical interventionist thinking to provide black women with new tools of resistance. The oral narrative of Mrs. Alma Kapper, who worked as a domestic and sharecropper in the black belt of Mississippi, is illuminated through the joining of black feminist thought and the performance paradigm. As a result, black feminist thought and the performance paradigm augment each other as analytical constructs in unveiling the many ways people “lettered” and “unlettered” theorize themselves.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)213-232
Number of pages20
JournalText and Performance Quarterly
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1993

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Visual Arts and Performing Arts
  • Literature and Literary Theory

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