The $16,819 pay gap for newly trained physicians: The unexplained trend of men earning more than women

Anthony T. Lo Sasso*, Michael R. Richards, Chiu Fang Chou, Susan E. Gerber

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

128 Scopus citations

Abstract

Prior research has suggested that gender differences in physicians' salaries can be accounted for by the tendency of women to enter primary care fields and work fewer hours. However, in examining starting salaries by gender of physicians leaving residency programs in New York State during 1999-2008, we found a significant gender gap that cannot be explained by specialty choice, practice setting, work hours or other characteristics. The unexplained trend toward diverging salaries appears to be a recent development that is growing over time. In 2008, male physicians newly trained in New York State made on average $16,819 more than newly trained female physicians, compared to a $3,600 difference in 1999.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)193-201
Number of pages9
JournalHealth Affairs
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

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