The anticancer drug edelfosine is a potent inhibitor of neovascularization in vivo

William R. Vogler*, Jianguo Liu, Olga Volpert, Edwin W. Ades, Noel Bouck

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Edelfosine is an alkyl-lysophospholipid that acts as an anticancer agent in vivo. To test the hypothesis that part of its antineoplastic activity may be due to its ability to inhibit the neovascularization on which the progressive growth of all tumors depends, we evaluated edelfosine in vitro and in vivo for antiangiogenic activity. Edelfosine acted directly on cultured capillary endothelial cells, inhibiting their migration toward the angiogenic factor, basic fibroblastic growth factor (bFGF), at doses of 8- 200 nM. When given systemically to rats (20 mg/kg IP twice daily), edelfosine was well tolerated and antiangiogenic. The majority of treated animals became unable to mount a corneal neovascular response to a pellet releasing bFGF, whereas vigorous vessel ingrowth was seen in untreated controls.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)549-553
Number of pages5
JournalCancer Investigation
Volume16
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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