The Association Between Depressive Symptoms and Cognitive Functioning in Older Hispanic/Latino Adults Enrolled in an Exercise Intervention: Results From the “¡Caminemos!” Study

Rosalba Hernandez*, Elaine Cheung, Minli Liao, Seth W. Boughton, Lisett G. Tito, Catherine Sarkisian

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: We examined the association between depressive symptoms and cognitive functioning in older Hispanics/Latinos enrolled in an exercise intervention. Method: We analyzed baseline, 1-year, and 2-year in-person interview data collected from Hispanics/Latinos aged ≥60 years participating in an exercise intervention across 27 senior centers (N = 572). Results: Mean age was 73.13 years; 77% female. At baseline, older adults screening positive for depression were 1.58 times more likely to experience cognitive impairment (p =.04); controlling for demographics and comorbid chronic conditions. Compared to peers with little to no depressive symptoms, lower cognitive functioning scores were evident at each follow-up assessment point where elevated depressive symptoms were present, but baseline depression was not associated with cognitive function in longitudinal analyses. Discussion: In older Hispanics/Latinos enrolled in an exercise intervention, though baseline depression did not predict cognitive function over time, elevated symptoms of depression were associated with greater cognitive impairment at every point in this study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)843-862
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of aging and health
Volume30
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2018

Keywords

  • Hispanics/Latinos
  • cognitive function
  • depressive symptoms
  • older adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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