The association of actigraphy-assessed sleep duration with sleep blood pressure, nocturnal hypertension, and nondipping blood pressure: the coronary artery risk development in young adults (CARDIA) study

Marwah Abdalla*, Swati Sakhuja, Oluwasegun P. Akinyelure, S. Justin Thomas, Joseph E. Schwartz, Cora E. Lewis, James M. Shikany, Donald Lloyd-Jones, John N. Booth, Daichi Shimbo, Martica H. Hall, Paul Muntner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective:Nocturnal hypertension and nondipping systolic blood pressure (SBP) are associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Short and long sleep duration (SSD and LSD) are also associated with increased CVD risk and may be risk factors for nocturnal hypertension and nondipping SBP. We examined the association between SSD and LSD with sleep BP, nocturnal hypertension, and nondipping SBP among 647 white and African American Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study participants who completed 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring, wrist actigraphy, and sleep diaries in 2015-2016.Methods:The times when participants were asleep and awake were determined from actigraphy complemented by sleep diaries. Nocturnal hypertension was defined as sleep BP ≥120/70 mmHg and nondipping SBP as mean sleep-to-awake SBP ratio >0.90. Sleep duration was categorized as SSD (<6 h), normal sleep duration (NSD: 6-8.9 h), and LSD (≥9 h).Results:The prevalence of SSD and LSD were 13.9 and 21.1%, respectively. Compared to participants with NSD, participants with LSD had higher mean sleep SBP (2.1 mmHg, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.2, 4.1 mmHg) and diastolic BP (1.7 mmHg, 95% CI 0.5, 3.0 mmHg). Participants with LSD had a higher prevalence of nocturnal hypertension (prevalence ratio [PR]: 1.26, 95% CI 1.03-1.54) and nondipping SBP (PR 1.33, 95% CI 1.03-1.72) compared to participants with NSD. There was no evidence of an association between SSD and sleep SBP or DBP, nocturnal hypertension, or nondipping SBP.Conclusions:These findings suggest that LSD may be associated with nocturnal hypertension and nondipping SBP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2478-2487
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of hypertension
Volume39
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2021

Keywords

  • nocturnal hypertension
  • nondipping blood pressure
  • sleep duration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology
  • Internal Medicine

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