The Association of Religious Affiliation with Overweight/Obesity Among South Asians: The Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study

Nazleen H. Bharmal, William J. McCarthy, Meghana D. Gadgil, Namratha R Kandula, Alka M. Kanaya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Religiosity has been associated with greater body weight. Less is known about South Asian religions and associations with weight. Cross-sectional analysis of the MASALA study (n = 906). We examined associations between religious affiliation and overweight/obesity after controlling for age, sex, years lived in the USA, marital status, education, insurance status, health status, and smoking. We determined whether traditional cultural beliefs, physical activity, and dietary pattern mediated this association. The mean BMI was 26 kg/m2. Religious affiliation was associated with overweight/obesity for Hindus (OR 2.12; 95 % CI: 1.16, 3.89), Sikhs (OR 4.23; 95 % CI: 1.72, 10.38), and Muslims (OR 2.79; 95 % CI: 1.14, 6.80) compared with no religious affiliation. Traditional cultural beliefs (7 %), dietary pattern (1 %), and physical activity (1 %) mediated 9 % of the relationship. Interventions designed to promote healthy lifestyle changes to reduce the burden of overweight/obesity among South Asians need to be culturally and religiously tailored.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-46
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Religion and Health
Volume57
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

Fingerprint

Atherosclerosis
Obesity
Exercise
Islam
Insurance Coverage
Marital Status
Religion
Health Status
Cross-Sectional Studies
Smoking
Body Weight
Education
Weights and Measures
Mediator
Religious Affiliation
Asia
Physical Activity
Healthy Lifestyle
Insurance
Religiosity

Keywords

  • Obesity
  • Overweight
  • Religious affiliation
  • South Asian

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Religious studies

Cite this

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title = "The Association of Religious Affiliation with Overweight/Obesity Among South Asians: The Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study",
abstract = "Religiosity has been associated with greater body weight. Less is known about South Asian religions and associations with weight. Cross-sectional analysis of the MASALA study (n = 906). We examined associations between religious affiliation and overweight/obesity after controlling for age, sex, years lived in the USA, marital status, education, insurance status, health status, and smoking. We determined whether traditional cultural beliefs, physical activity, and dietary pattern mediated this association. The mean BMI was 26 kg/m2. Religious affiliation was associated with overweight/obesity for Hindus (OR 2.12; 95 {\%} CI: 1.16, 3.89), Sikhs (OR 4.23; 95 {\%} CI: 1.72, 10.38), and Muslims (OR 2.79; 95 {\%} CI: 1.14, 6.80) compared with no religious affiliation. Traditional cultural beliefs (7 {\%}), dietary pattern (1 {\%}), and physical activity (1 {\%}) mediated 9 {\%} of the relationship. Interventions designed to promote healthy lifestyle changes to reduce the burden of overweight/obesity among South Asians need to be culturally and religiously tailored.",
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The Association of Religious Affiliation with Overweight/Obesity Among South Asians : The Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study. / Bharmal, Nazleen H.; McCarthy, William J.; Gadgil, Meghana D.; Kandula, Namratha R; Kanaya, Alka M.

In: Journal of Religion and Health, Vol. 57, No. 1, 01.02.2018, p. 33-46.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T2 - The Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study

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N2 - Religiosity has been associated with greater body weight. Less is known about South Asian religions and associations with weight. Cross-sectional analysis of the MASALA study (n = 906). We examined associations between religious affiliation and overweight/obesity after controlling for age, sex, years lived in the USA, marital status, education, insurance status, health status, and smoking. We determined whether traditional cultural beliefs, physical activity, and dietary pattern mediated this association. The mean BMI was 26 kg/m2. Religious affiliation was associated with overweight/obesity for Hindus (OR 2.12; 95 % CI: 1.16, 3.89), Sikhs (OR 4.23; 95 % CI: 1.72, 10.38), and Muslims (OR 2.79; 95 % CI: 1.14, 6.80) compared with no religious affiliation. Traditional cultural beliefs (7 %), dietary pattern (1 %), and physical activity (1 %) mediated 9 % of the relationship. Interventions designed to promote healthy lifestyle changes to reduce the burden of overweight/obesity among South Asians need to be culturally and religiously tailored.

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