The Berlin Questionnaire for assessment of sleep disordered breathing risk in parturients and non-pregnant women

N. Higgins*, E. Leong, C. S. Park, F. L. Facco, R. J. McCarthy, C. A. Wong

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Pregnancy is associated with alteration in sleep patterns and quality. We wished to investigate whether pregnant women have a higher likelihood of a positive Berlin Questionnaire than non-pregnant women. Methods: Pregnant women ages 18-45 years (n = 4074) presenting for delivery, and non-pregnant women ages 18-45 years (n = 490) presenting for outpatient surgery provided demographic information and completed the Berlin Questionnaire evaluating self-reported snoring and daytime sleepiness. For the pregnant patients, the infant's birth weight and Apgar scores were also recorded. Results: Of the 1439 patients with a positive Berlin Questionnaire, 96 were in the non-pregnant control population versus 1343 in the pregnant population (20% vs. 33%, respectively, P < 0.001; odds ratio 2.0 [95% CI: 1.6-2.5]). There was a positive correlation between infant weight and a positive Berlin Questionnaire. The incidence of preeclampsia was greater (odds ratio 3.9) in the pregnant patients with a positive Berlin Questionnaire as compared with the parturients with a negative Berlin Questionnaire (odds ratio 1.1). Conclusion: Parturients are more likely to have a positive Berlin Questionnaire than non-pregnant women. This may indicate an increased likelihood of sleep disordered breathing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)22-25
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Obstetric Anesthesia
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2011

Keywords

  • Berlin Questionnaire
  • Pregnancy
  • Sleep disordered breathing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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