The Big Cities Health Inventory, 1997

Nanette Benbow*, Yue Wang, Steven Whitman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

This manuscript reports on the publication of a unique document, The Big Cities Health Inventory, 1997: The Health of Urban U.S.A., which was released in July 1997 by the Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH). The report presents data on 20 important health indicators such as AIDS, cancers, tuberculosis, sexually transmitted diseases, homicide, heart disease, infant mortality and low birthweight. Indicators of morbidity are gathered from participating local health departments and indicators of mortality and maternal and child health are obtained from vital records files provided by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). The data are displayed and analyzed in two sections. The first consists of a series of tables presenting overall rates, gender and race/ethnicity-specific rates and city rankings according to these measures. These rankings provide meaningful comparisons between and within cities for specific demographic characteristics. The second component presents sample analyses which illustrate the possible uses of this information. The report represents an important tool for health professionals, researchers, policy markers and community advocates dedicated to promoting healthier cities. Such array of city-level data, to our knowledge not available from any other source, could indeed begin to lead to public health interventions that will impact the well-being of residents of large urban areas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)471-489
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Community Health
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 18 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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