The blacks of Panama: Their genetic diversity as assessed by 15 inherited biochemical systems

Robert E. Ferrell*, Aminta Nunez, Terry Bertin, Darwin R. Labarthe, William J. Schull

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Panama's black citizens are culturally and historically divisible into two groups, the Spanish‐speaking coloniales and the English‐speaking anglos or afro‐antillanos. Until recently these groups have been geographically as well as culturally isolated one from the other, although both are predominantly of West and Southwest African origin. Assessment of the genetic diversity within‐villages and within language groups reveals as much, possibly somewhat more, diversity in 15 inherited biochemical markers within villages and language groups as that which obtains between villages and language groups. A number of rare variants at the 6‐phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase, and esterase D loci were encountered and are described.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)269-275
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Physical Anthropology
Volume48
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1978

Keywords

  • Genetic distance
  • Genetic diversity
  • Isozymes
  • Panama
  • Protein polymorphisms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Anthropology

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