The causes and consequences of increased female education and labor force participation in developing countries

Rachel Heath, Seema Jayachandran

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Two important recent trends in most developing countries are the rise in female labor force participation and the closing of gender gaps in school enrollment. This article begins by exploring the causes of the increases in female education, which include greater job availability and policy interventions that have promoted girls' education. The article then explores the causes of increased female employment, which include a sectoral shift from "brawn-based" industries to services, as well as policies that have increased girls' education. The article also discusses the effects of these increases in female education and labor supply, particularly for the well-being of women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Oxford Handbook of Women and the Economy
PublisherOxford University Press
Pages345-367
Number of pages23
ISBN (Electronic)9780190628963
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Keywords

  • Developing countries
  • Female education
  • Female employment
  • Gender gap
  • Labor force

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)

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