The class III histone deacetylase sirtuin 1 in immune suppression and its therapeutic potential in rheumatoid arthritis

Sinyi Kong, Pricilla Yeung, Deyu Fang*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating disease of the joints. Both the innate and adaptive immune responses participate in the development and progression of RA. While several therapeutic reagents, such as TNF-α agonists, have been successfully developed for the clinical use in the treatment of RA, more than half of the patients do not respond to anti-TNF therapy. Therefore, new therapeutic reagents are needed. Recent studies have shown that sirtuin 1 (Sirt1), a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent histone deacetylase, is a critical negative regulator of both the innate and adaptive immune response in mice, and its altered functions are likely to be involved in autoimmune diseases. Small molecules that modulate Sirt1 functions are potential therapeutic reagents for autoimmune inflammatory diseases. This review highlights the role of Sirt1 in immune regulation and RA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)347-354
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Genetics and Genomics
Volume40
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 20 2013

Keywords

  • Epigenetic
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Sirt1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

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