The classical and the one-and-a-half ventricular options for surgical repair in patients with discordant atrioventricular connections

Carl L. Backer*, Robert D. Stewart, Constantine Mavroudis

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The classical option for surgical repair in patients with congenitally corrected transposition takes advantage of the physiologic correction provided by nature. At the end of the surgical procedures, however, the morphologically right ventricle remains as the systemic ventricle. Surgical intervention is essentially the correction of associated lesions, including closure of ventricular septal defects, pulmonary valvotomy, placement of a conduit from the morphologically left ventricle to the pulmonary arteries, replacement of the morphologically tricuspid valve, and placement of pacemakers for third degree atrioventricular block. For many years, the classical approach was the "standard" surgical approach.1-4 More recently, newer alternatives have become available, including forms of anatomic repair, the "one-and-a half" ventricular option, and conversion to the Fontan circulation. The goal of anatomic repair is to craft connections such that the morphologically left ventricle becomes the systemic ventricle. Surgical techniques that accomplish this are a Rastelli procedure combined with an atrial baffle,5 and the combination of an arterial switch with an atrial baffle, be it a Mustard or Senning procedure.6

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-96
Number of pages6
JournalCardiology in the young
Volume16
Issue numberSUPPL. 3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2006

Keywords

  • Cavopulmonary anastomosis
  • Congenital heart disease
  • Congenitally corrected transposition
  • Hypoplastic ventricles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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