The cognitive change in women study (CCW): Informant ratings of cognitive change but not self-ratings are associated with neuropsychological performance over 3 years

Rebecca Gavett*, Julie E. Dunn, Anne Stoddard, Brian Harty, Sandra Weintraub

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

The value of self-reported memory complaints for identifying or predicting future cognitive decline or dementia is controversial, but observations from a third party, or "informant," may prove more useful. The relationship between Informant and Self-ratings of cognitive status and neuropsychological test scores was examined in a cohort of 384 nondemented, community-dwelling women, aged 60 years and older, participating in a single-site Women's Health Initiative ancillary study. Each participant and her respective informant separately completed the Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (IQCODE). Participants also underwent neuropsychological testing and responded to questionnaires on depression and functioning in complex activities of daily living. All neuropsychological test scores were significantly correlated (P values <0.05 to <0.01) with IQCODE ratings whereas Self-ratings overestimated cognitive functioning in some domains. Furthermore, the Self and Informant ratings were both positively correlated with depression and negatively correlated with participants activity level. Therefore, informant judgments of functional abilities are robust predictors of cognitive status in high functioning nondemented women. These results suggest that informants may be sensitive to changes that are not clinically significant but that may represent an incipient trend for decline.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)305-311
Number of pages7
JournalAlzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2011

Keywords

  • IQCODE
  • Normal aging
  • cognitive impairment
  • informant rating
  • screening
  • self rating

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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