The content and properties of the caregiver activities time survey (CATS): An outcome measure for use in clinical trial research on Alzheimer's disease

Elizabeth C. Clipp, Michael J. Moore, Linda K. George

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Caregiver Activities Time Survey (CATS) was developed in 1990, pilot tested and revised twice before its use in a long-term study of Mentane® (velnacrine maleate), conducted by Hoechst Roussel Pharmaceuticals Inc. (currently Hoechst Marion Roussel Pharmaceuticals). The instrument yields ratio level data and, by relying on caregivers' reports of minutes per task, is more objective and theoretically less ambiguous than other subjective ratings. Overall alpha of the informal scale is. 51 suggesting modest internal consistency which is not surprising given that caregiving tasks are more discrete than items on scales presumed to tap one dimension. Test-retest reliability of individual items suggests good reproducibility of scores over a J0-week period Criterion-related validity was demonstrated by the strong relationships shown between the CATS and several measures of cognitive functioning. Longitudinal data support the CATS'sensitivity to change in disease severity. Ratings by a panel of experts suggest very good to excellent content validity of both informal caregiving andformal or paid caregiving CATS scales.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-9
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias
Volume11
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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