The content of internal medicine residency training and its relevance to the practice of medicine - Implications for primary care curricula

Gary J. Martin*, Raymond H. Curry, Paul R. Yarnold

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using survey items from Kern et al. (1985), 192 former residents rated their preparation in, and the importance of, three content areas of their residency training ("basic skill and knowledge areas," "allied medical disciplines," and "areas related to the practice of medicine"). Mean ratings replicated those reported by Kern et al. (r=0.70 to 0.97, p<0.004). Using additional data about current practice patterns, ratings by general internists were compared with ratings by subspecialists. Both groups identified basic skill and knowledge areas as most important and felt that many areas related to practice management had been underempbasized. Most allied medical disciplines, however, were more important to generalists. Exposure to non-internal medicine areas seems important for residents considering a primary care career, but not for those considering subspecialization. However, all residents may benefit from increased emphasis on basic clinical skills and practice management. Program directors may want to address these issues, given the recent decline in applications to internal medicine programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)304-308
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of general internal medicine
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 1989

Keywords

  • basic skills
  • internal medicine residency
  • medical knowledge
  • practice management
  • primary care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

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