The critical path method in stroke rehabilitation: lessons from an experiment in cost containment and outcome improvement.

J. A. Falconer*, Elliot J Roth, J. A. Sutin, D. C. Strasser, Rowland W Chang

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

102 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study tested the effects of a project network technique called the Critical Path Method (CPM) on the costs and outcomes of inpatient team stroke rehabilitation. On admission to a large, academic, inpatient rehabilitation hospital adults who had a recent (< 120 days) stroke were randomly assigned to receive rehabilitation services from a team trained in CPM (N = 53) or from usual care teams (N = 68). Results showed no significant difference between groups in length of stay, hospital charges, or functional status at discharge. CPM may be effective in patient care services that are less influenced by specialization, professional issues, and external regulation and in settings where patient outcomes are relatively fixed and predictable, and medical care is integrated across institutions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8-16
Number of pages9
JournalQRB. Quality review bulletin
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Leadership and Management

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