The cross-sectional and longitudinal association between perceived neighborhood walkability characteristics and depressive symptoms in older latinos: The "¡Caminemos!" study

Rosalba Hernandez*, Kiarri N. Kershaw, Thomas R. Prohaska, Pin Chieh Wang, David X. Marquez, Catherine A. Sarkisian

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Evaluate the cross-sectional and longitudinal association between perceived walkability-related neighborhood characteristics (e.g., traffic safety) and depressive symptoms among community-dwelling older Latino adults. Method: We used baseline, 12-month, and 24-month in-person interview data collected from Latinos aged ≥60 years participating in an exercise intervention at 27 senior centers (N = 570). Results: In cross-sectional analyses, lower perceived neighborhood crime, indicative of greater neighborhood walkability, was associated with a lower odds of elevated symptoms of depression (odds ratio [OR] = 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI] = [0.82, 0.996]; p =.04) after adjusting for demographic characteristics, linguistic acculturation, and medical comorbidities. Associations between Neighborhood Environment Walkability scales and incident depressive symptoms at 12- and/or 24-months were not statistically significant, but the point estimate for crime safety was consistent with cross-sectional findings (OR = 0.83; 95% CI = [0.64, 1.07]; p =.16), suggesting a protective effect for lower perceived neighborhood crime. Discussion: Lower perceived neighborhood crime is associated with reduced presence of elevated symptoms of depression in older Latinos.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)551-568
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of aging and health
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 20 2015

Keywords

  • Hispanics/Latinos
  • depressive symptoms
  • neighborhood/environment
  • older adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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