The Development of Children's Understanding of Maps and Models: A Prospective Cognition Perspective

David H Uttal, Kelly J. Sheehan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article takes a prospective cognition perspective in reviewing research on the development of children's understanding of spatial symbols, such as scale models and maps. We suggest that using spatial symbols requires that children think about where an object will be found rather than where they last saw it. In addition, we suggest that as children's knowledge of maps grows, they begin to think about largescale space through the mediated perspective that maps provide.

Maps allow people to see and to think about multiple relations among locations, as well as spaces that are much larger than can be directly perceived. Learning about the world through maps is a good example of what Tomasello (1999) called the cultural ratchet effect; each generation can rely on information from prior generations rather than having to learn or discover it on their own. Thus, cultures share views of space through maps, and the development of the cognition of large-scale space consists in part of learning to think about the world through maps.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)188-200
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Cognitive Education and Psychology
Volume13
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The Development of Children's Understanding of Maps and Models: A Prospective Cognition Perspective'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this