The distribution of the cells of origin of callosal projections in cat visual cortex

M. A. Segraves, A. C. Rosenquist

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

122 Scopus citations

Abstract

The distribution of neurons projecting through the corpus callosum (callosal neurons) was examined in retinotopically defined areas of cat visual cortex. As many callosal neurons as possible were labeled in a single animal by surgically dividing the posterior two-thirds of the corpus callosum and exposing the cut ends of callosal axons to horseradish peroxidase. The distribution of callosal neurons within a visual field representation was related to standard electrophysiological maps as well as to recording sites marked by electrolytic lesions. Callosal neurons were found in every retinotopically defined cortical area. The portion of the visual field representation that contained callosal neurons increased progressively from the area 17/18 border to area 19, to areas 20 and 21, and to the lateral suprasylvian visual areas. In area 17, the portion of the visual field representation containing callosal neurons extended from the vertical meridian out to a maximum of 10° azimuth. In the posteromedial lateral suprasylvian visual area, callosal neurons were present in a region extending from the vertical meridian representation out to a representation of 60° azimuth. Most callosal neurons were medium to large pyramids at the border of layers III and IV. A few layer IV stellates were among the callosal neurons of areas 17 and 18. In area 19 and even more so in the lateral suprasylvian visual areas, callosal neurons included pyramidal and fusiform-shaped cells in layers V and VI. The laminar distributions of callosal neurons in areas 20 and 21 were similar to those of area 19 and the lateral suprasylvian visual areas. The widespread distribution of callosal neurons in areas 20 and 21 and in the lateral suprasylvian visual areas suggests that the regions of peripheral visual field representation in cat cortex, as well as the representations of the vertical meridian, have access to the opposite cerebral hemisphere. This finding is significant in light of demonstrations of the importance of some of these cortical areas in the interhemispheric transfer of visual learning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1079-1089
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume2
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1982

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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