The dopamine paradox in lung and kidney epithelia: Sharing the same target but operating different signaling networks

Alejandro M. Bertorello*, Jacob I Sznajder

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

Stimulation of dopamine receptors in the lung or kidney epithelia has distinct and opposite effects on the function of Na,K-ATPase, which results in increased Na+ absorption across the alveolar epithelium and increased sodium excretion via the kidney epithelium. In the lung, dopamine increases Na,K-ATPase by increasing cell basolateral surface expression of Na +,K+-ATPase molecules, whereas in the kidney epithelia itdecreases Na+,K+-ATPaSe activity by removing active units from the plasma membrane by endocytosis. The opposite effects of dopamine over the same target (the Na+,K+-ATPase) involve the activation of a distinct signaling network that it is target specific, and has a different spatial resolution. Understanding the specific signaling pathways involved in these actions of dopamine and their hierarchical organization may facilitate the drug discovery process that could lead to the design of new therapeutic approaches to clear lung edema in patients with acute lung injury and to decrease fluid overload during congestive heart failure and hypertension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)432-437
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of respiratory cell and molecular biology
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2005

Keywords

  • Endocytosis
  • Na,K-ATPase
  • Na-transport

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The dopamine paradox in lung and kidney epithelia: Sharing the same target but operating different signaling networks'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this