The economics of dying — the illusion of cost savings at the end of life

E. J. Emanuel, L. L. Emanuel*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

296 Scopus citations

Abstract

For more than a decade, health policy analysts have noted — and some have decried — the high cost of dying17. With the acceleration of pressures on health care costs and calls for reform, considerably more attention has been focused on proposals to control costs at the end of life8. One proposal would require persons enrolling in a health care plan to complete an advance directive9,10. Others would require hospitals to establish guidelines to identify and reduce futile care1113. Similar ideas have been expressed by members of President Bill Clinton's Health Care Task.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)540-544
Number of pages5
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume330
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 24 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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