The effect of a recorded model on band students' Performance self-evaluations, achievement, and attitude

Steven Morrison, Mark Montemayor, Eric S. Wiltshire

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this study, xue examined effectiveness of recorded models in the context of ensemble rehearsals. Over a 5-week treatment period, directors of three middle/junior high and two high school bands systematically included professional recordings as part of their preparation of selected pieces. Students completed weekly self-evaluation reports assessing their individual progress and their ensembles' progress on model and no-model pieces. Using numerical and free-response formats, students evaluated self-achievement and ensemble achievement on notes/rhythms, articulation/dynamics, tuning, and balance. Expert evaluations revealed? no difference in achievement between model and no-model pieces on pretreatmenl and posttreatment performance recordings. Student evaluations showed more modest achievement gains for model pieces. High school students demonstrated more positive self-evaluations for their own versus their ensembles' performance and greater overall differentiation in their evaluations across time. Middle school/junior high students were significantly more positive toward the model pieces. All students p/ovided a greater number of free-response comments for model pieces.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)116-129
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Research in Music Education
Volume52
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Music

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