The Effect of a Text Messaging Based HIV Prevention Program on Sexual Minority Male Youths: A National Evaluation of Information, Motivation and Behavioral Skills in a Randomized Controlled Trial of Guy2Guy

Michele L. Ybarra*, Weiwei Liu, Tonya L. Prescott, Gregory Phillips, Brian Mustanski

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

There is a paucity of literature documenting how the constructs of the Information–Motivation–Behavioral Skills (IMB) model are affected by exposure to technology-based HIV prevention programs. Guy2Guy, based on the IMB model, is the first comprehensive HIV prevention program delivered via text messaging and tested nationally among sexual minority adolescent males. Between June and November 2014, 302 14–18 year old gay, bisexual, and/or queer cisgender males were recruited across the US on Facebook and enrolled in a randomized controlled trial testing Guy2Guy versus an attention-matched control program. Among sexually inexperienced youth, those in the intervention were more than three times as likely to be in the “High motivation” group at follow-up as control youth (aOR = 3.13; P value = 0.04). The intervention effect was not significant when examined separately for those who were sexually active. HIV information did not significantly vary by experimental arm at 3 months post-intervention end, nor did behavioral skills for condom use or abstinence vary. The increase in motivation to engage in HIV preventive behavior for adolescent males with no prior sexual experience is promising, highlighting the need to tailor HIV prevention according to past sexual experience. The behavioral skills that were measured may not have reflected those most emphasized in the content (e.g., how to use lubrication to reduce risk and increase pleasure), which may explain the lack of detected intervention impact. Clinical Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov ID# NCT02113956.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3335-3344
Number of pages10
JournalAIDS and behavior
Volume22
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

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Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • HIV prevention
  • Information–Motivation–Behavioral model
  • LGBT
  • MSM
  • Sexual minority
  • mHealth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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