The Effect of Interface Damage on the Microbuckling of Unidirectional Fiber-Reinforced Composites

Y. Huang*, C. Liu, M. G. Stout, K. C. Hwang

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Fiber microbuckling is the primary failure mechanism in unidirectional fiber-reinforced composites under compression. Due to processing or service conditions, damage (e.g., microsacks) exists at fiber/matrix interfaces. The effect of damage on the microbuckling of fibers is investigated in the present study. Based on the micromechanics analysis, the damage at interfaces is modeled as a linear spring against interface sliding, and the spring constant depends on the damage level. It is established that the critical strain for fiber microbuckling is relatively insensitive to the interface damage, but increase rapidly with the fiber volume fraction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)473-478
Number of pages6
JournalKey Engineering Materials
Volume145-149
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998

Keywords

  • Fiber-Reinforced Composites
  • Interfacial Damage
  • Microbuckling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

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