The Effect of Judge Selection on Standard Setting Using the Mastery Angoff Method during Development of a Ventricular Assist Device Self-Care Curriculum

Jeffrey H Barsuk, Rebecca S. Harap, Elaine R. Cohen, Kenzie A Cameron, Kathleen L Grady, Jane E Wilcox, Kerry B. Shanklin, Diane Bronstein Wayne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Patients and caregivers need to perform ventricular assist device (VAD) self-care safely to help prevent complications (e.g., infection). We developed a VAD self-care simulation-based mastery learning (SBML) curriculum. We determined optimal minimum passing scores (MPSs) and evaluated effects of judge selection. Methods: A multidisciplinary team created a VAD self-care SBML curriculum including simulated skills and knowledge examinations. Patients, caregivers, VAD coordinators, and physicians were expert judges who determined MPSs using the Mastery Angoff method. Results: MPSs for the skills and knowledge examinations were high (range = 94%-99% and 97% correct, respectively). Judges closely agreed on MPSs. Conclusions: Stakeholders set stringent MPSs for high-stakes VAD self-care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-47.e4
JournalClinical Simulation in Nursing
Volume27
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

Fingerprint

Heart-Assist Devices
Self Care
Curriculum
Curricula
curriculum
Caregivers
caregiver
Learning
examination
simulation
Complications
learning
Infection
Simulation
stakeholder
physician
Standards
expert
Physicians
Range of data

Keywords

  • Mastery Angoff
  • mastery learning
  • self-care
  • simulation
  • standard setting
  • ventricular assist device

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Nursing (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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title = "The Effect of Judge Selection on Standard Setting Using the Mastery Angoff Method during Development of a Ventricular Assist Device Self-Care Curriculum",
abstract = "Background: Patients and caregivers need to perform ventricular assist device (VAD) self-care safely to help prevent complications (e.g., infection). We developed a VAD self-care simulation-based mastery learning (SBML) curriculum. We determined optimal minimum passing scores (MPSs) and evaluated effects of judge selection. Methods: A multidisciplinary team created a VAD self-care SBML curriculum including simulated skills and knowledge examinations. Patients, caregivers, VAD coordinators, and physicians were expert judges who determined MPSs using the Mastery Angoff method. Results: MPSs for the skills and knowledge examinations were high (range = 94{\%}-99{\%} and 97{\%} correct, respectively). Judges closely agreed on MPSs. Conclusions: Stakeholders set stringent MPSs for high-stakes VAD self-care.",
keywords = "Mastery Angoff, mastery learning, self-care, simulation, standard setting, ventricular assist device",
author = "Barsuk, {Jeffrey H} and Harap, {Rebecca S.} and Cohen, {Elaine R.} and Cameron, {Kenzie A} and Grady, {Kathleen L} and Wilcox, {Jane E} and Shanklin, {Kerry B.} and Wayne, {Diane Bronstein}",
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T1 - The Effect of Judge Selection on Standard Setting Using the Mastery Angoff Method during Development of a Ventricular Assist Device Self-Care Curriculum

AU - Barsuk, Jeffrey H

AU - Harap, Rebecca S.

AU - Cohen, Elaine R.

AU - Cameron, Kenzie A

AU - Grady, Kathleen L

AU - Wilcox, Jane E

AU - Shanklin, Kerry B.

AU - Wayne, Diane Bronstein

PY - 2019/2/1

Y1 - 2019/2/1

N2 - Background: Patients and caregivers need to perform ventricular assist device (VAD) self-care safely to help prevent complications (e.g., infection). We developed a VAD self-care simulation-based mastery learning (SBML) curriculum. We determined optimal minimum passing scores (MPSs) and evaluated effects of judge selection. Methods: A multidisciplinary team created a VAD self-care SBML curriculum including simulated skills and knowledge examinations. Patients, caregivers, VAD coordinators, and physicians were expert judges who determined MPSs using the Mastery Angoff method. Results: MPSs for the skills and knowledge examinations were high (range = 94%-99% and 97% correct, respectively). Judges closely agreed on MPSs. Conclusions: Stakeholders set stringent MPSs for high-stakes VAD self-care.

AB - Background: Patients and caregivers need to perform ventricular assist device (VAD) self-care safely to help prevent complications (e.g., infection). We developed a VAD self-care simulation-based mastery learning (SBML) curriculum. We determined optimal minimum passing scores (MPSs) and evaluated effects of judge selection. Methods: A multidisciplinary team created a VAD self-care SBML curriculum including simulated skills and knowledge examinations. Patients, caregivers, VAD coordinators, and physicians were expert judges who determined MPSs using the Mastery Angoff method. Results: MPSs for the skills and knowledge examinations were high (range = 94%-99% and 97% correct, respectively). Judges closely agreed on MPSs. Conclusions: Stakeholders set stringent MPSs for high-stakes VAD self-care.

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KW - standard setting

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