The effects of sweep numbers per average and protocol type on the accuracy of the P300-based concealed information test

Ariana B. Dietrich, Xiaoqing Hu, J. Peter Rosenfeld*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

In the first of two experiments, we compared the accuracy of the P300 concealed information test protocol as a function of numbers of trials experienced by subjects and ERP averages analyzed by investigators. Contrary to Farwell et al. (Cogn Neurodyn 6(2):115-154, 2012), we found no evidence that 100 trial based averages are more accurate than 66 or 33 trial based averages (all numbers led to accuracies of 84-94 %). There was actually a trend favoring the lowest trial numbers. The second study compared numbers of irrelevant stimuli recalled and recognized in the 3-stimulus protocol versus the complex trial protocol (Rosenfeld in Memory detection: theory and application of the concealed information test, Cambridge University Press, New York, pp 63-89, 2011). Again, in contrast to expectations from Farwell et al. (Cogn Neurodyn 6(2):115-154, 2012), there were no differences between protocols, although there were more irrelevant stimuli recognized than recalled, and irrelevant 4-digit number group stimuli were neither recalled nor recognized as well as irrelevant city name stimuli. We therefore conclude that stimulus processing in the P300-based complex trial protocol - with no more than 33 sweep averages - is adequate to allow accurate detection of concealed information.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)67-73
Number of pages7
JournalApplied Psychophysiology Biofeedback
Volume39
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014

Keywords

  • Concealed information test
  • Deception
  • Event-related potential
  • P300

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

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