The effects of transverse rotation angle on compression and effective lever arm of prosthetic feet during simulated stance

Matthew J. Major*, David Howard, Rebecca Jones, Martin Twiste

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background and Aim: Unlike sagittal plane prosthesis alignment, few studies have observed the effects of transverse plane alignment on gait and prosthesis behaviour. Changes in transverse plane rotation angle will rotate the points of loading on the prosthesis during stance and may alter its mechanical behaviour. This study observed the effects of increasing the external transverse plane rotation angle, or toe-out, on foot compression and effective lever arm of three commonly prescribed prosthetic feet.Technique: The roll-over shape of a SACH, Flex and single-axis foot was measured at four external rotation angle conditions (0°, 5°, 7° and 12° relative to neutral). Differences in foot compression between conditions were measured as average distance between roll-over shapes.Discussion: Increasing the transverse plane rotation angle did not affect foot compression. However, it did affect the effective lever arm, which was maximized with the 5° condition, although differences between conditions were small.Clinical relevanceIncreasing the transverse plane rotation angle of prosthetic feet by up to 12° beyond neutral has minimal effects on their mechanical behaviour in the plane of walking progression during weight-bearing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)231-235
Number of pages5
JournalProsthetics and Orthotics International
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2012

Keywords

  • Biomechanics of prosthetic/orthotic devices
  • gait
  • prosthetic feet
  • testing of prosthetic and orthotic components

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Professions (miscellaneous)
  • Rehabilitation

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